Tag Archives: EDU 6526

EDU 6526 Session 9: Meta Reflection, Social Learning

One of the learning families I want to summarize from this course is the process of inductive teaching.  Constructing ideas and concepts from the students themselves provides meaning and engagement.  This method of teaching can be scary to some teachers as there is not a direct goal or path when working with students.  Generating ideas from the students is a great way to get their minds thinking and brainstorming.  The next step is focusing on one topic to promote deep thinking and comprehension.  “One is focusing the investigation, helping the students concentrate on a domain (an area of inquiry) they can master, without constricting them so much that they can’t use their full abilities to generate ideas.” ( Calhoun, Joyce, & Weil, 2015, p 42)  Giving students the freedom to choose their own domains allows them to collectively pull together a meaningful topic where they can be most successful.

Another social learning method is role playing.  Students are able to develop social skills, investigate social issues, and develop empathy when working with one another.  By putting themselves in different simulated roles, they can discover their own values and how best to work with others.  “It explores how values drive behavior and raises student consciousness about the role of values in their lives.” (Calhoun, Joyce, & Weil, 2015, p 258)  Students can begin to figure out how to interact cooperatively with others and respectfully disagree when conflict arises.  Humans are inherently social and giving students the time and space to develop these skills with provide them with long term benefits.

Reference

Calhoun, E., Weil, M., & Joyce, B. (2015). Models of Teaching. (9th ed.) Boston: Pearson.

EDU 6526 Session 8: Positive Interactions foster Student Self Esteem

Teachers can foster student self-esteem by creating and maintaining positive, trusting relationships with students.  According to Rogers (n.d.), teacher empathy, respect, and the frequency with which the teacher gave praise, accepted student ideas, and asked for thinking are methods for students to feel successful at school.  Teachers promote the student’s self-concept (general sense of personal value) as well as their self-efficacy (personal beliefs about one’s ability to be a successful learner), when treating their students with respect and valuing their voice in the classroom.  When we are positive in our teaching practice, we will receive positive student behaviors.  Having strong interpersonal skills benefits all areas of teacher responsibility.

Carl Rogers emphasizing the importance of these interactions with students and the benefits that come along with them.  In regards to under-achieving students, teacher empathy dramatically increases their ability to succeed in their work.  “The level of person-to-person conditions the teacher offers to under-achieving students more frequently produced significant main effects on school attendance, gain in reading and math achievement, and change in I.Q. scores and self-concept . . .” (Rogers, n.d.).  These youth in our classes at times can be difficult to reach and many approaches often do not work.  Through Rogers’ research, positive relationships play a huge role with these students and can greatly impact their self-concept in regards to being a learner.  As teachers, the more respect, acceptance, and student involvement we can provide, the more successful and effective our students will become.

Reference

Rogers, C. (n.d.). Teacher effects research on student self concept. Handout from EDU 6526, Seattle Pacific University, Feb 29, 2016.

https://bbweb03.spu.edu/bbcswebdav/pid-1133738-dt-content-rid-2472075_1/courses/EDU6526_26357_201562/SIS%20Session%208%20Reading%20%28Rogers%29.pdf

EDU 6526 Session 7: Role Models and Affective Education

Students learn more than academics when they enter a classroom.  They learn lifelong skills such as how to function in a group and work productively with others.  The role of the teacher is to facilitate this process and act as a role model that students learn from.  Teaching with integrity is key when working with students for them to learn by example.  One of the Six Priorities of Affective Education is “Establishing a climate of trust.” Session 7- Learner Centered In order to do this, the teacher must act honestly and thoughtfully with students so they feel emotionally safe and comfortable.  Only then will they truly open up, voice their full opinions, and feel accepted as a learner in the classroom.  Students pick up how teachers act, even when they see them outside of the classroom, so living an honest, moral life is important for students to learn.

Children and youth are socially intelligent and understand when they are being truly listened to and heard.  A teacher cannot fake these interactions and their relationships with students highly depend on their honesty and kindness.  “Students know when their teachers are committed to their psychomotor, cognitive, and affective learning, and they can tell when their teachers genuinely care about them and are trustworthy, honest, and respectful.” (Lumpkin, 2008, p. 47)  These are morals and virtues all teachers want to instill in their classrooms, creating life-long learners that contribute to a prosperous society.  The teacher-student relationship is so important in shaping attitudes towards education and observing teacher values is how students make sense of the learning world.

 

Reference

Lumpkin, A., (2008). Teachers as Role Models, Teaching Character and Moral Virtues. JOPERD 79: 2, 45-49.

EDU 6526 Session 6: Problem Solving and Class Meetings

Students come to school with sets of values they may not be able to identify themselves but will show when they work with their peers.  Problem solving, cooperation, and collaboration are all developed in the classroom.  As they interact with one another, they discover the roles they will play with one another.  Utilizing role playing activities gives students a chance to practice social skills as well as discover what is important to their lives.  “It explores how values drive behavior and raises student consciousness about the role of values in their lives and those of others.  A direct effect is greater understanding about and empathy with differences in values as people interact.” (Calhoun, Weil, & Joyce, 2015, p. 258).   Students figure out how to cooperate with one another and overcome obstacles.  They begin to learn how to operate in a group and how best they can use their strengths.

In the kindergarten class I work in, we have a weekly “class meeting” where we sit down and discuss any issues that need to be addressed.  The teacher writes down student problems or concerns on a paper flip chart and discusses each one by one (see image below).  Students practice listening to one another and find ways to peacefully solve problems.  They are held accountable to the solutions and are referenced back to them if needed.  As the solutions come directly from the students, they carry more weight and have greater impact then the teacher simply telling them what they need to do.  Students work with one another in class meetings, examine what’s important to them, and learn lifelong social skills they will use in future grades.

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Reference

Calhoun, E., Weil, M., & Joyce, B. (2015). Models of Teaching. (9th ed.) Boston: Pearson.

EDU 6526 Session 5: Socially Constructed Knowledge

Classrooms are environments that model the larger world.  Learning how to work together, solve problems, and negotiate points of view are vital skills needed to be taught.  Students learn how to interact in a class setting and take with them skills to use in future professional and social relationships. These important skills are constructed socially as they learn through one another viewpoints and interactions.  Students figure out how to negotiate with each other which in turn helps each person negotiate their own world, making sense of their values within the larger society. “The abilities to continually reconstruct one’s value stance and to create compatible value systems are both essential to mature development.” (Calhoun, Weil, & Joyce, 2015, p. 249)  When they are finished in our classrooms, they will need to know how to problem solve with their peers.  Working with others effectively is a crucial life-long skill.

Mortimer Adler’s “Paidea Principles” outline what schools should focus on as their objectives.  http://www.paideia.org/about-paideia/philosophy/  “That the three callings for which schooling should prepare all Americans are, (a) to earn a decent livelihood, (b) to be a good citizen of the nation and the world, and (c) to make a good life for one’s self.”  (National Paideia Center, 2015).  In order to be good citizens and make a good life for one’s self, students need to know how to negotiate in the world.  They will face difficult obstacles and interactions that need social skills to solve.  Instilling positive, productive, and healthy democratic processes in classrooms will prepare students to be good citizens in the world.

Reference

Calhoun, E., Weil, M., & Joyce, B. (2015). Models of Teaching. (9th ed.) Boston: Pearson.

National Paideia Center. (2015) Paideia: Active Learning. Retrieved February 6, 2016, from http://www.paideia.org/about-paideia/philosophy/

EDU 6526: Session 4, Advance Organizers

Advance organizers are useful tools and a strategy teachers can use in their classrooms to prepare students for instruction.  The method allows teachers to figure out what students know about a particular topic and provide a preview of what the lesson will be.  “ . . . the purpose of graphic organizers is to make clear to students what they will be learning with regard to a particular topic.” (Dean, Hubbell, Pitler, & Stone, 2012, p. 62)  Students get a sense of the information which will prepare their minds to better learn the material.  Organizers are also equally important as a screening tool to gage what they already know.

There are a variety of approaches when it comes to advance organizers and certain formats are better than others depending on the type of lesson.  Dean, Hubbell, Pitler & Stone (2012) describe four formats: expository, narrative, skimming, and graphic.  Expository advance organizers explain in written or verbal form the content students are about to learn and specifically the critical pieces the teacher wants the students to remember.  Exp Organizer In this example, the teacher, Ms. Hollman uses an expository organizer to activate prior knowledge of students and get them ready for new information in the upcoming video.  Students can then see their responses before and after the film to witness their own learning.   This format works well for this activity but might not in another.   Understanding the correct use of all the formats would be beneficial to teachers to get quality data and information from their students.  The more a teacher practices the use of these organizers, the better they will become at successfully implementing them into their practice.

Reference

Dean, C.,  Hubbell, E.R., Pitler, H., & Stone, B. (2012) Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement 2nd Ed. United States of America: McREL International.

EDU 6526 Week 3: Learning by Discovery

Jerome S. Brunner’s article, Some Elements of Discovery, discusses methods of teaching where students use knowledge and learning from school in meaningful and effective ways.  Tools that students can draw upon when progressing to the next subject, grade, or level.  Rather than focusing on learning new material, students need to discover what they already know to approach new information.  “Discovery teaching involves not so much the process of leading students to discover what is ‘out there,’ but, rather, their discovering what is in their own heads.” (Brunner, 1966)  Students have many skills they can use towards education, they just need the techniques discover them.  Figuring out what they’ve got is the first step to higher learning and thinking.

Brunner compares student’s learning by discovery to concept formation in an example where a class develops ideas of a steadying tool when discussing what the purpose of a compass to draw circles is.  The students collaborated together and made meaning from information they already knew.  When students listened to each other, they found more and more connections which grew the class’s understanding.  ““The children are getting connections that allow them to travel from one part of the system to the other and when something new comes in, they find compatible connections.” (Brunner, 1966)  The students formed their own abstract idea of what a steadying tool is based on evidence they already had in their heads.   Teaching students methods to unlock this potential will lead to productive and effective approaches to all areas of their education.

Reference

Brunner, J. S. (1966). Some Elements of Discovery. Learning by Discovery: A Critical Appraisal.

Rand McNally & Company: Michigan.