Tag Archives: EDTC6433

EDTC 6433 ISTE Standard 4 Digital Citizenship Poster

Digital Citizenship is important for students so they understand proper and appropriate behavior with technology and in online settings.  Students are using technology usually on a daily basis and the same morals and values from offline interactions apply.  At times it can be difficult for adults and teachers to track and monitor online activity so reinforcing these concepts will encourage digital etiquette.  Having a poster for students to reference is a great way to get them thinking about appropriate use with technology.  It also gives parents and families great ideas to practice at home.  The home school connection is important to remain consistent.

Students should also be aware of safe practices with digital resources and tools such as up to date virus protection.  There are a lot of personal information and documents we save on our computers so making sure we are protecting ourselves with current and effective software is needed.  Physical safety is also good to be aware of such as eye safety and proper posture when using devices.  It is easy to create bad habits and spend a long amount of time on our computers.  Making sure we are using safe practices and taking breaks in between longer assignments will allow our students to decrease injury as digital citizens.

http://chrismans56eaf64cb066e.edu.glogster.com/edtc-6433-digital-citizenship/

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EDTC 6433 Module 5 – Professional Development and Teacher Modeling

Triggering Question: As an elementary teacher, how can I model life long learning by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources?

In order for teachers to continuously improve their professional practice with the use of digital tools and resources, teachers must understand what is available to them and opportunities for collaboration with colleagues.  There are many resources that benefit teacher understanding of the changing field of technology.  The US Department of Education released their Technology Plan for schools to adopt allowing teachers access to multiple learning communities.  They called this “connected teaching” which uses technology to create digital online communities for effective results.  Teachers can form communities with students, fellow teachers, administrators, or education specialists to collectively collaborate on educational issues.  Connected teaching provides new ways of interaction that improves professional practice through new activities such as online posting, discussions, and animations for instruction and quizzing.  Using new digital tools with students models life-long learning by the teacher as they are experimenting with new tools to increase effectiveness of their instruction.

A member in my learning community who is focusing on physical and health education posted a link to a site that has up to date information on health and fitness strategies in school.  It informs educators of upcoming opportunities for in person professional development.  This is an example of a site that allows teachers to stay current with changes happening to programs such as health and fitness.  It lets teachers make effective use of emerging digital resources and model for students how to stay current on professional issues.

Reference

US Department of Education. (2010). Transforming American Education Learning Powered by Technology. Washington D.C. (38-50)

file:///C:/Users/Scott%20Chrisman/Downloads/2010%20Manzo.pdf

Shape America: Soceity of Health and Physical Educators. (2016) Retrieved on March

13, 2016, from http://www.shapeamerica.org/

EDTC 6433: Digital Storytelling Project

I chose to tell a personal narrative of my experience as a chaperone for a high school national youth gathering where I learned a lot about what it means to be a servant.  Those interested in community service, youth leaders, volunteers, high school students, and anyone else who has a caring heart and passion for working in the community would be interested in viewing it.  This could be used in a formal educational setting when teaching about work in the community, how people affect one another in community, or teaching about the diversity we have in our large cities in the country.  I demonstrated competency on ISTE NETS Standard 1 for Teachers by modeling creative and innovative thinking, engaging students in exploring real world issues, and by promoting the use of a digital tool to tell an important story.

The process of digital storytelling began slowly.  I came up with the content pretty easily because this event took place just last summer.  The bulk of the work came from searching for a program that could meet the requirements of the assignment.  At first I tried Microsoft Sway, uploading photos into the order that worked for my story.  Unfortunately after doing this I could not find a way to add narration, music, or record it, so I had to move to Windows Live Movie Maker and start again.  It took me a lot longer than I anticipated mostly because I was unfamiliar with the software.  Most of the time I was experimenting around and searching for the right tools.  Having experience or training with the program definitely would have helped complete the assignment.

The most significant things I learned while completing this project was having an open ended, student choice topic allowed me to have full creativity of the assignment.  I could choose a topic that was important to my life and creatively present it in a format of my choice.  Having so many options allows a student to truly create a project that they are passionate about and that is meaningful to their lives.  Having some practice ahead of time with Windows Live Movie Maker would have been helpful, but experimenting with something new is a great learning method as well.  Creating this digital story was a great experience to look back at my trip to Detroit and a project I can come back to when reflecting about my service in the Motor City.

EDTC 6433 Module 4: Digital Citizenship and Safe Technology Practices

Triggering Question

As a teacher, how can I stay current with local and global societal issues and exhibit legal and ethical behavior in the classroom?

The technology world is continuing to develop and change at a rapid rate that directly influences the classrooms we teach in.  Students engage with technology on a daily basis at home and at school.  It is our job as educators to teach children safe and healthy practices regarding the use of technology and online identities.  Teachers need to exhibit legal and ethical behavior in their practice and model this for students.  Staying up to date with how technology is changing will help educators provide the most accurate information to students.  Miller & Ribble describe the importance of collaboration to meet the issues technology can bring.  “Educational leaders, faculty members, students, parents, and community members must work together to create workable solutions for the rapidly increasing problems related to appropriate use and digital citizenship.” (Miller & Ribble, 2012, p 144)  Leaders will promote and model digital etiquette by relating online interactions to real life interactions and that the two are the same.  Treating each other politely with kindness and respect in both venues is important to emphasize so students know the two are not so different and separate.

One of the members of my learning circle also addressed the importance of teacher modeling to students.  Technology can be a distraction tool from learning if used improperly in the classroom.  By teacher modeling, students can see how to use digital resources in class and any assignments related to technology.  Students in this digital age have a lot of screen time both at home and school.  Showing students the positive, educational uses for technology will allow them to effectively use their devices in the classroom helping them learn.

 

Reference

Northern Miller, T. & Ribble, M. (2012). Educational leadership in an online world: Connecting students to technology responsibly, safely, and ethically. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 17: 1, 137-145.

file:///C:/Users/Scott%20Chrisman/Downloads/C631F5EC-A504-431F-8386-E36EEDFB9978.pdf

EDTC 6433 Module 3: Emerging Literacy Practices

Triggering Question: What training, resources, and programs are available as an innovative 3rd grade educator in a global and digital society?

Subject matters change throughout the years in school and as teachers, we need to be able to adapt and change our practices.  In terms of literacy, methods of teaching has shifted from memorization and repetition, to social interactions and construction from their peers.  “ . . . literacy is now shared and socially situated, and students must know how to cooperate and collaborate as they author, design, and customize their literacy efforts to the demand of the situation.” (Wake & Wittingham, 2013, p 178)  As subject matters transform, new technology systems emerge and educators must demonstrate fluency with these programs.  Wake and Wittingham (2013) describe this change in literacy and conduct an experiment with teacher candidates to find out how much they already know about certain programs, time to use the programs, and level of comfortability of using it in with students.  Results found that teachers were willing to use the technology in classrooms if they had adequate professional training beforehand.   Starting training and familiarity during internship will lead to application of these programs effectively in the future which will meet literacy requirements in the digital society.

As literacy changes, so does the emphasis on other subjects such as Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM).  Schools are pushing towards high achievement in these areas to get students prepared for the global and digital world.  One of the members in my learning circle posted a link to a series of STEM simulation activities that wouldn’t necessarily be possible with school resources.  http://blog.discoveryeducation.com/blog/2011/10/08/great-games-and-simulation-tools-for-teaching-stem-content-p2/

Having this source as an alternative will help students understand concepts and get some practice using materials they would otherwise not have access too.  This is another way educators can transfer current knowledge to new technologies and situations.

 

Reference

Discovery Education (2011). Great Games and Simulation Tools for teaching STEM Content! (P2) Retrieved February 13, 2016 from http://blog.discoveryeducation.com/blog/2011/10/08/great-games-and-simulation-tools-for-teaching-stem-content-p2/

Wake, D., & Whittingham, J. (2013) Teacher candidates’ perceptions of technology supported literacy practices. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 13(3), 175-206.

EDTC 6433: Module 2,Collaboration for the Digital Age

Triggering Question: As a third grade teacher, what tools and resources can I use to develop collaboration that supports individual learning and contributes to the learning of others?

ISTE Standard 2 involves designing and developing learning experiences in the digital age.  One way to design lessons with a digital focus is to gear them toward collaboration and working with each other.  In this way, they are learning from one another’s thoughts and extending ideas through conversation and discussion.  The focus of learning from one another and a learner’s environment is seen in Vygotsky’s social development theory.  Ciconni (2013) describes new computer programs being used in classrooms that are providing academic collaboration over media.  The kids are boosting their own learning by listening to one another’s thoughts.  “Using technology to engage students in collaborative endeavors deepens their understanding of math concepts by offering rigorous learning through relevant projects with authentic audiences.” (Ciconni, 2013, p 64) The program “Voki” allowed students to create avatars (computerized persons with attributes) and use the avatars to share ideas through typed text, computer microphone, sound file upload, or phone.  They are exciting venues for students that create engagement and a chance to make meaning out of their learning.

Students are able to have autonomy over their learning by using these programs to find their own voice and path to understanding lessons at school.  Another way digital resources can foster autonomy is through individualized accounts on eBooks.  A member of my learning circle posted a resource on the effectiveness of eBooks and though it doesn’t answer my question towards collaboration, it does assist in making students feel in control of their learning and progress.  An online reading program called ICANREAD (Ciampa, K. 2012), studied whether electronic eBooks would motivate 1st grade students, change attitudes about online reading and improve students comprehension literacy skills.  Studies found that students were more engaged and interactive with devices, able to track their own reading progress, and access to a wide variety of resources.  Although I still prefer physical books, this article suggests the benefits of online reading programs and how successful they can be when implemented properly.

Reference

Ciampa, K. (2012). ICANREAD: the effects of an online reading program on grade 1 students engagement and comprehension strategy use. Journal of Research on Technology in Education 45 (1) 27-59

Cicconi, M. (2013). Vygotsky Meets Technology: A Reinvention of Collaboration in the Early Childhood Mathematics Classroom. Early Childhood Education Journal 42: 57-65

https://canvas.instructure.com/courses/992608/files/39077556?module_item_id=8641932

Week 1, Module 1: Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity

Triggering Event Question: How can third grade students use the internet, power point, audio, and video files in presentation to creatively demonstrate knowledge of a particular topic?

Students use technology every day and finding methods to incorporate these devices in classrooms can greatly benefit learning.  ISTE Standard one states: Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity.  Technological resources are available and can be used by students to creatively express their opinions and ideas.  Alaa Sadik (2008) conducted a study in Egyptian classrooms to find the effectiveness of Digital Storytelling, the ability to use the internet and photos to craft a narrative presentation.  Results of the study included an increase in student motivation and engagement, deep thinking around personalized topics, and more compelling and interesting presentations due to the wide variety of tools available.  However, teachers wanted additional professional development and training to effectively manage and instruct use of these computer resources.  Digital storytelling is a great way to inspire student learning and creativity in the classroom that creates an engaging experience for all students.  Educators need effective training regarding this tool to thoughtfully find ways to apply it in their classrooms.

A member of my learning community posted an article by Robert J. Marzano (2009) regarding the use of another classroom tool, the interactive white board.  A study was conducted involving 85 teachers and 170 classrooms where teachers used interactive whiteboards to teach a set of lessons which they then taught to another group of students without this technology.  Results found that there was a relatively equal amount of positive results from the classes with the use of the whiteboards and those without.  This shows that teacher instruction and planning is still a crucial aspect of the classroom.  The whiteboards can be a tool for both teachers and students to present information but again needs to have adequate training to effectively use these classroom tools.   Best classroom practice should be continued with the appropriate and effective use of new technological resources.

Reference

Marzano, R. (2009). The Art and Science of Teaching / Teaching with Interactive Whiteboards. Educational Leadership. 67: 80-82.

Sadik, A. (2008). Digital storytelling: a meaningful technology-integrated approach for engaged student learning. Educational Technology Research and Development. 56:487–506.